Monday, March 17, 2014

TO LECTURE OR NOT TO LECTURE THAT IS THE QUESTION; MULTIPLE TEXT READING INTO WRITING ACTIVITY

With the countless new opportunities provided by technology, experts are beginning to question hallowed customs like lecturing as a means of teaching advocating student centered class rooms, seminars and individual work instead. Are they right? Is it time for a change in the centuries old method of disseminating information or are they being over enthusiastic? Do the following three reading tasks and determine where you stand. Then write an argumentative essay.
Level of Difficulty for the Whole Task: ***
The reason for the above: the writing task is challenging
BEFORE YOU READ
·        ·  Lecturing or interactive teaching https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKN8tjAgPgY
·         Christopher Emdin: Teach teachers how to create magic
https://www.ted.com/talks/christopher_emdin_teach_teachers_how_to_create_magic 
TEXT ONE: LECTURES DIDN’T WORK IN 1350 – AND THEY STILL DON’T WORK TODAY
By: Hope Reese
Published: The Atlantic, November 2013
1.       What are the learning models Thornburg identifies?
2.       The reason why school was so depressing for Thornburg was the fact that:
·         He was made to fit in with the system
·         No allowances were made for individual differences
·         No allowances were made for individual ways of learning
·         All of the above
·         None of the above
·         Other: please specify
3.       Thornburg’s experience at The National Academy of Sciences led him to decide that ……………………………………………………………………..were needed.
4.       Read the description of the holodeck. The two reasons why this learning environment is so engrossing are the facts that the experience………………………………………………………………………..
5.       The holodeck was discovered to be a very successful way of teaching because the kids that took part in the Mars mission had gone on to……………………………………………………………………..
6.       What does the sentence “That’s changing” mean? In other words, what is happening? The focus of math education is shifting to……………………………………………………………………………..
7.       The writer does not have a problem with the content of math lessons but he does have a problem with ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
8.       Thornburg refers to Laurentius de Voltolina’s painting to prove that:
·         The working environment has been the same for a long time
·         Students talk or fall asleep during a lecture
·         Lecture based models don’t work
·         All of the above
·         None of the above
·         Other: please specify
9.       Thornburg states that what determines degree of concentration in children is……………………….
10.   When discussing whiteboards and Kindle, Thornburg criticizes the fact that……………………………
11.   How, specifically does he suggest new technologies should be used?
12.   What does “that” refer to in the sentence “And that’s an art”?
13.   Thornburg’s criticism of the flipped learning model is the fact that………………………………………
14.   Which of the pieces of criticism directed against having cell phones in the classroom does Thornburg not have an answer for?
15.   The teacher in the example embraced technology in the classroom because it enabled…………
16.   What is it about technology that students need to learn?
17.   Look at the last paragraph of the text. What is the function of the second sentence and the last sentence? How do they relate to each other?
TEXT TWO: IS THE LECTURE DEAD?
“Education isn’t just about conveying information as efficiently as possible. A lecture, done right, gets to the heart of why a lesson is worth learning.”
By: Richard Gunderman
Published: The Atlantic, January 2013
QUESTIONS
1.       The advantages of the use of technology in classrooms and small-group interactive learning are the facts that they enable………………………………………………………………………………………………
2.       Why did one of Texas’ medical schools get a rap on the knuckles?
3.       Could the first sentence of paragraph four be considered a summary of paragraph three? Why or why not?
4.       What is the purpose of paragraph four? Which sentence is the thesis statement? What is the function of the other sentences?
5.       A really good lecturer, by being physically present in real time, is able to do something an online learning module cannot. He is able to…………………………………………………………………………..
6.       What is the relationship of the paragraph beginning “The core purpose” to the last sentence of the previous paragraph?
7.       Which sentence in the same paragraph best expresses the advantage of lectures?
8.       The bonus of great lectures is that they…………………………………………………………………………………..
9.       Where else could you put the sentence “A great lecturer tells a story” and the following sentence?
10.   How does a good lecturer engage the students?
11.   State an example of a lecture that would be deadly dull. One involving…………………………………
12.   Read the stories of Pausch and Steve Jobs. The lesson we learn from both is that people should…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
13.   The writer praises Pausch and Jobs because they were able to……………………………………………….
14.   In the conclusion the writer states that our aim should be to………………………………………………….
TEXT THREE: DON’T GIVE UP ON THE LECTURE
“Teachers who stand in front of their classes and deliver instruction are not out-of-touch-experts – they are models”
By: Abigail Walthaysen
Published: The Atlantic, November 21, 2013
QUESTIONS
1.       Read the first short paragraph of the text. What conclusion can you draw from it? You will need to tweak the text.
2.       Many would agree with Thornburg that “lectures create a depressing experience”. What has been the result of this widely held view in terms of lesson planning?
3.       Paulo Friere and Alison King agree concerning the role of………………………………………………..
4.       How dependable are the results of the study comparing the “sage-on-the-stage” model and the “guide-on-the-side” model? Why or why not?
5.       The major arguments in favor of lecturing are as follows:
6.       What are the major arguments against lectures?
7.       Read the account of the writer’s college experience. What conclusion can we draw concerning the seminar model?
8.       Read the first sentence of the last paragraph. What is the reason? Use your own words.
9.       What overall conclusion is reached in the text?
WRITING TASK
Now that you have been through texts defending and criticizing the lecture, it is time to put pen to paper and write an argumentative essay. While doing so, you can opt for the “guide-to-the-side” method, the “sage-on-the-stage” method or a happy medium with a little of both. Remember not to rush this task so no clocks; it is more important that you get the organization and content right. Most importantly, enjoy yourself; this is one tough writing task.

TO LECTURE OR NOT TO LECTURE THAT IS THE QUESTION; MULTIPLE TEXT READING INTO WRITING ACTIVITY KEY AND TEACHER’S NOTES
This trio of texts all slot in together beautifully with the first coming out strongly for the “guide-to-the-side” method, the second coming out firmly in favor of the “sage-on-the-stage” method and the last one striking a balance so students have three options. If you decide to do this as a class activity you will need to spread it out over, at least, two days. If you are doing this on your own, I would suggest three days to reinforce all the learning.
TEXT ONE: KEY
1.       The camp fire or lecture based design, the watering hole or social learning, the cave, a place to quietly reflect and life where ideas are tested.
2.       All
3.       Technologies to support different types of learning
4.       Is immensely interactive and the kids feel almost like they are there.
5.       Study the topic on their own
6.       Real mathematics
7.       How you learn
8.       Other: 1+3
9.       Engagement. Nothing else will logically do.
10.   Are used to do the same old things better
11.   To do other things with these tablets and computers; taking new tools and using them in powerful new ways; to do things we couldn’t do before at all.
12.   Knowing when to give information and when to stop giving information.
13.   It is being used to perpetuate a traditional educational model
14.   Playing games all day long or inappropriate use of the phone.
15.   Real interesting stuff to be done or move the conversation in a very wonderful direction
16.   When it is appropriate to use tools
17.   Topic sentence, concluding statement, they enable the paragraph to hold together as a meaningful whole.
TEXT TWO: KEY
1.       Interactive, customized and self paced learning alternatives.
2.       Because its curriculum relied too heavily on passive approaches to learning – foremost among them lectures.
3.       No it doesn’t cover group sessions; highly touted technologies that have turned out not to enliven education.
4.       Rather than disposing entirely of the lecture as a means of learning, we should attempt to understand better the features that distinguish effective engaging lectures from those that leave learners limp. The purpose is support and transition to the next paragraph.
5.       Engage their imaginations and inspire them. The whole sentence won’t do because modules inform learners as well.
6.       The paragraph expands on the sentence so the sentence provides transition.
7.       The real purpose of a lecture is to show the mind and heart of the lecturer at work and to engage the minds and hearts of learners.
8.       Open learners’ eyes to new questions, connections and perspectives that they have not considered before, illuminating new possibilities for how to work and live.
9.       At the beginning of the previous paragraph before the example
10.   Sharing responsibility for solving problems with learners, working with them in real time to find a solution.
11.   A rote, mechanical reading of notes
12.   Have the courage to follow their heart.
13.   Get us thinking about our lives from fruitful new perspectives and help us seek out and find new meaning in the work we do every day.
14.   To perfect the lecture so far as we can.
TEXT THREE: KEY
1.       Lectures give a negative initial impression
2.       Only 10 or 15 minutes of the hour are allotted to teacher disseminated information, while the rest of the class period is centered on practice in groups or project based learning.
3.       The lecturer
4.       Not completely; there is no way to account for the teachers who gravitate towards lecturing because they excel at it, and those who encourage group work because they are comfortable managing such dynamics.
5.       It can create a more democratic experience for students than a lesson that is entirely student focused; teachers are irreplaceable as models of knowledgeable adults grappling with first principles in order to open their students’ understanding; a passionate display of erudition is valuable in itself.
6.       Lecturing is daunting to student confidence; the uniform pace diminishes student attention.
7.       Being clueless in a discussion class is much more embarrassing and destructive of a student’s self confidence.
8.       Possible answer: Lectures are popular
9.       The last sentence: there is no one method of education that fails across the board, only…















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